User Rating: 5 / 5

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We've always been proud that WWIIOL:Battleground Europe claims the unofficial "Toughest PvP on the Planet" spot amongst modern day MMOs. It's one of the few games around that requires a great deal of skill and patience to play and excel at. And when a player has been around the game for 3, 5 or even 10 years, that skill set gets pretty impressive. I've seen veteran players take down running infantry when they render at barely a few pixels high. And it's no surprise when a relatively new player gets winged because he's not quite as good at hiding as he thinks he is. It's not too hard to spot a guy crawling through a row of bushes when you're really looking for him. Trust me, I'm not that good a player and even I've dispatched of "cleverly" hidden players (all the while giggling to myself).

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Weeks and, in the case of a few dedicated Beta team members, months of research provided the Art department with a very detailed set of Style Guides. These guides were invaluable tools in creating the new infantry models that you see in 1.33 today. With some help from an off-site art intern, Bruce “TOTO” Patnaude fired up 3D Studio Max and began to model six unique avatars and a library of distinctive kit objects.

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There was some recent concern expressed among pilots when the new 1.33.0.11 Readme was released, particularly this entry:

Aircraft Gun Convergence:
- audited all minimum convergence to be 100m (was up to 250m)
- convergence ranges standardized 100m to 800m

DOC takes a moment to explain what the actual change was and how it does NOT effectively alter the current gun convergence.

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Just as important as making sure the new models were as accurate as possible and sexy as hell was making sure the darn things actually worked in the game. That's were the coders stepped in. Troy “RAMP” Lowe, was called on to apply his mad coding skillz to a wide range of tasks, from creating new tools for art to ensuring that animations and skeletons all worked as intended. Some of you might recall an early video showing what kinds of things can go horribly wrong when you're working on a game.

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